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1
/ 5m - GRB 080319b
« : 19 Март 2008, 17:13:54 »
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Hello everyone,

For those of you not subscribed to the High Energy Network, there are now
two reports on GRB 030819B that indicate the burst briefly reached
naked-eye visibility within 30-60 seconds of the Swift trigger.  All-sky
monitoring by the "Pi of the Sky" camera indicate the burst may have
reached an R-band magnitude in the mid-5's.  The burst is now below
16 (we are about 10 hours post-burst now).  Pretty amazing!

The relevant GCNs are here:

http://www.aavso.org/pipermail/aavso-hen/2008-March/007026.html

http://www.aavso.org/pipermail/aavso-hen/2008-March/007027.html

Clear skies,

Matthew

4
/ 100
« : 02 Сентябрь 2007, 00:18:10 »





5
/ SS Cyg
« : 18 Август 2007, 23:58:36 »
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[vsnet-outburst 7981] SS Cyg outburst

Visual magnitude estimates by MAEDA Yutaka(VSOLJ member)

object       YYYYMMDD(UT)   mag   code
CYGSS    20070818.649   113    Mdy.VSOLJ
         

Instrument  25cm SC

MAEDA Yutaka
Nagasaki Japan

AAVSO:
http://www.aavso.org/cgi-bin/newlcg.pl?name=SS+CYG&lastdays=40&start=&stop=2454331.3304&button_name=Please+Wait...&obscode=&obstotals=on&type=ps&width=600&height=450&style=points&mag1=&mag2=&visualunvalidated=on&visualvalidated=on&v=on

6
/ 2007
« : 10 Август 2007, 10:48:27 »
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AAVSO Special Notice #55

Possible Nova in Vul
August 8, 2007

CBET 1027 reports that Hiroshi Abe has discovered
a new bright nova around August 8, at coordinates
19:54:24.64 +20:52:51.9 J2000
and with brightness V=9.4mag.  A possible progenitor
star is visible on the POSS-I survey plates at
about V=18.

This sounds like an ideal target for northern observers.
You can plot the field using VSP:
http://www.aavso.org/observing/charts/vsp/index.html
and entering the coordinates given above.  This is about
7arcmin from SS Vul, a Mira that is not on the AAVSO
program.  We will create a sequence for the new nova
as soon as possible.
Arne
---------------------------------------------------
SUBMIT OBSERVATIONS TO THE AAVSO

Information on submitting observations to the AAVSO may be found at:
http://www.aavso.org/observing/submit/

SPECIAL NOTICE ARCHIVE AND SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

A Special Notice archive is available at the following URL:
http://www.aavso.org/publications/specialnotice/

Subscribing and Unsubscribing may be done at the following URL:
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AAVSO Special Notice #56

N Vul 07
August 9, 2007

N Vul 07 (CBET 1027, AAVSO Special Notice #55) is most likely a nova;
high-resolution spectra are being analyzed to confirm the object's nature.
An AAVSO Alert Notice will be issued later, but the purpose of this special
notice is to inform observers that:

- N Vul 07 (19:54:24.64 +20:52:51.9 (2000.0)) has been added to the AAVSO
files as 1950+20 N VUL 07.
- An AAVSO chart with photometry by Richard Miles may be obtained from the
AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (VSP) by going to
http://www.aavso.org/observing/charts/vsp/
and entering 1950+20 or N VUL 07.
- Observations reported to the AAVSO indicate that N Vul 07 is continuing
to brighten:
AUG 08.9604 UT, 9.30 CCD (based on USNO A2.0), D. Rodriguez, Madrid, Spain;
09.0056, 9.3 (based on Tycho magnitude), S. Swierczynski, Dobczyce, Poland;
09.0486, 9.0, Swierczynski;   
09.0590, 9.4 (AAVSO RS Sge comparison sequence), G. Chaple, Townsend, MA;
09.0931, 8.7, M. Komorous, London, Ontario, Canada;
09.1111, 8.7 (GSC 1625-855 (8.6), GSC 1629-594 (9.0)), L. Shotter, Uniontown,PA;
09.1875, 8.4 (based on Tycho magnitudes), R. King, Duluth, MN;
09.2083, 8.7 (GSC1628-1232 (8.4), GSC1628-214 (9.1), J. Bortle, Stormville, NY;

Tim Crawford, Arch Cape, OR, reports V photometry (using Richard Miles' value
of 9.802V for comparison star TYC 1628 0666):
Aug 09. 19576 UT, 8.368;
.21751, 8.349;
.24450, 8.361;
.27008, 8.344;
.38532, 8.223;
.40890, 8.178;
.43109, 8.143.

Please submit your observations of N VUL 07 to the AAVSO via WebObs as soon
as possible after you make them. Please be sure to include the comparison
stars used.

Many thanks and good observing!

This special notice was compiled by: Elizabeth O. Waagen


---------------------------------------------------
SUBMIT OBSERVATIONS TO THE AAVSO

Information on submitting observations to the AAVSO may be found at:
http://www.aavso.org/observing/submit/

SPECIAL NOTICE ARCHIVE AND SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

A Special Notice archive is available at the following URL:
http://www.aavso.org/publications/specialnotice/

Subscribing and Unsubscribing may be done at the following URL:
http://www.aavso.org/publications/email/


7
/
« : 23 Май 2007, 13:36:17 »

8
/
« : 07 Май 2007, 22:13:11 »
http://arxiv.org/abs/0705.0605
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TYC 1031 01262 1: The First Known Galactic Eclipsing Binary with a Type II Cepheid Component
S.V. Antipin, K.V. Sokolovsky, T.I. Ignatieva
We present the discovery and CCD observations of the first eclipsing binary with a Type II Cepheid component in our Galaxy. The pulsation and orbital periods are found to be 4.1523 and 51.38 days, respectively, i.e. this variable is a system with the shortest orbital period among known Cepheid binaries. Pulsations dominate the brightness variations. The eclipses are assumed to be partial. The EB-subtype eclipsing light curve permits to believe that the binary's components are non-spherical.

9
/ GW Lib: ?
« : 15 Апрель 2007, 01:58:36 »
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GW Lib
 
By now, everyone interested in cataclysmic variables
has probably heard that GW Lib is in outburst.  It
has only had one recorded previous outburst, in 1983
(see Duerbeck 1987, Space Sci. Rev. 45, 68).  The
big guns in CV research are really excited about
this outburst, as the white dwarf in the GW Lib
system is a nonradial pulsator (DAZQ) with periods
of 646, 376 and 237 seconds.  However, at quiescence,
it is too faint to get good signal/noise at these
short periods with "small" professional telescopes.
GW Lib also has one of the shortest orbital periods,
about 76.78 minutes.  Thorstensen et al. (2002,
PASP 114,1108) indicate that GW Lib's spectrum and outburst
behavior make it a close twin to WZ Sge.  Woudt and Warner
(2002, ApSpaSci 282, 433) also found a 2.09hr modulation
in some years but not in others, with unknown origin.

As the outburst progresses, we should have a chance to
see how the pulsations change with temperature.  During
the beginning stages, the disk will be dominant and
the pulsations from the white dwarf should be hard to
see, but as the outburst ends, the WD should again
become dominant.

Therefore, observations at all time scales, including
the shortest that you can make and still get S/N around 50,
will be important.  Likewise, don't feel that you need to
keep with a V filter - the bluer filters, B and especially U,
will be very important in following the temperature changes.
I'd bet that Target of Opportunity proposals have been
submitted for the major satellites, so your monitoring
activity will be important for later correlation by
the professionals.

Good luck!  This outburst may be a very short one, or it
may last for weeks like WZ Sge.  We just don't know, and
that is half of the fun.
Arne

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11
/ !
« : 22 Февраль 2007, 02:15:22 »

12
/ 10 VLA(!)
« : 16 Февраль 2007, 08:53:56 »

13
/
« : 12 Февраль 2007, 14:32:47 »
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0702248Finding Periods in High Mass X-Ray Binaries
Authors: Gordon E. Sarty, Laszlo L. Kiss, Helen M. Johnston, Richard Huziak, Kinwah Wu
Comments: Accepted: JAAVSO

    This is a call for amateur astronomers who have the equipment and experience for producing high quality photometry to contribute to a program of finding periods in the optical light curves of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXB). HMXBs are binary stars in which the lighter star is a neutron star or a black hole and the more massive star is an O type supergiant or a Be type main sequence star. Matter is transferred from the ordinary star to the compact object and X-rays are produced as the the gravitational energy of the accreting gas is converted into light. HMXBs are very bright, many are brighter than 10th magnitude, and so make perfect targets for experienced amateur astronomers with photometry capable CCD equipment coupled with almost any size telescope.

14
/
« : 31 Октябрь 2006, 22:58:13 »

15
/ ?
« : 10 Май 2006, 00:51:17 »

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